Chapter Iv

reigns op edward the confessor and harold ii., a.d. 1042-1066.

The short interval between the Danish and Norman conquests, during which the crown of England reverted to the Saxon line, furnishes us with only-two anecdotes of costume worth recording. The first is the general complaint of William of Malms-bury, that in the time of the Confessor the English had transformed themselves into Frenchmen and

Normans, adopting not only their strange manner of speech and behaviour, but also the ridiculous and fantastic fashions of their habits, wearing shorter tunics, and clipping their hair and shaving their beards, leaving, however, the upper lip still unshorn.1 They were also guilty of puncturing their skins, and loading their arms with golden bracelets.8 The second respects a change ordered by Harold in

8 In the reign of James II. the chest containing the body of King Edward the Confessor was opened, and under the shoulder-bone of the Monarch was found a crucifix of pure gold, richly enamelled, and suspended to a golden chain tweuty-four inches in length, which, passing round the neck, was listened by a locket of massy gold, adorned with four

8 In the reign of James II. the chest containing the body of King Edward the Confessor was opened, and under the shoulder-bone of the Monarch was found a crucifix of pure gold, richly enamelled, and suspended to a golden chain tweuty-four inches in length, which, passing round the neck, was listened by a locket of massy gold, adorned with four thb military habit, which led to his decisive successes in Wales. The heavy armour of the Saxons (for the weight of the tunic, covered with iron rings, was considerable) rendered them unable to pursue the Welsh to their recesses. Harold observed this impediment, and commanded them to use armour made of leather only, and lighter weapons.* This leathern armour we find to have consisted in overlapping flaps, generally stained of different colours, and cut into the shape of scales or leaves. It is called corium by some of the writers in the succeeding century, and corietum in the Norman laws. It was most probably copied from the Normans, for in the Bayeux tapestry we perceive it worn by Guy, Count of Ponthieu, and Odo, Bishop of Bayeux, the brother of William the Conqueror, and it continued in use in England as late as the thirteenth century.

large red stones. The sknll, which was entire, had on it a band or diadem of gold, one inch in breadth, surrounding the temples, and in # the dust lay several pieces of gold, coloured silk, and linen. Archaxriogia, vol. iii. p. 890. Introduction to Gough's Sepulchral Monuments.

Willimn I. and Attendante. From the Bayeux tapestry.

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