Caution

In general, I still recommend shooting with strobes. You have much more versatility and a lot more control. Often you cannot get enough power output from a constant light, so you're forced to shoot at higher ISOs or have too limited a depth of field. For more photographic situations, strobes are still preferable.

If you are interested in creating a unique visual aesthetic to make your images stand out from your competition, look at trying constant fluorescent tube lighting. The main company that creates these movie lights, Kino Flo, has lit just about every major movie since the early 1990s. Broncolor Kobold also makes these tube lighting solutions. Although these are fluorescent tubes, they are actually daylight or tungsten balanced and are frequently employed for unique lighting in music videos and fashion shoots.

As a fashion flair photographer, your goal is to construct images that stand out from the competition. A Kino Flo (or another fluorescent tube) might be the perfect solution for creating one-of-a-kind lighting. You can arrange these tubes in various configurations that create light unlike anything you've ever seen.

In Figure 9.17, for example, I took four tubes, tied them together into a tic-tac-toe pattern, and then shot through the center of the lens. The catchlights in the subject's eyes are fascinating, and the even lighting looks high fashion. Furthermore, because the light is weaker constant light, I could shoot at wide apertures and create a beautiful and narrow depth of field.

Dramatic Light Fashion Photography

Figure 9.17

I achieved this image by arranging four Kino Flo tubes in a tic-tac-toe pattern. These constant-light fluorescent tubes allow for truly unique lighting setups that create distinct fashion flair in your imagery.

Figure 9.17

I achieved this image by arranging four Kino Flo tubes in a tic-tac-toe pattern. These constant-light fluorescent tubes allow for truly unique lighting setups that create distinct fashion flair in your imagery.

Here are a few more lighting diagrams to get your creative juices flowing for fashion photography. I don't have my lights anchored to a specific place on the floor of my studio; I move them around frequently. I often change the power of the lights, their location, and the modifiers. I don't restrict myself to formulas. The "formulas" that follow are just guidelines to inspire and guide you. Don't get caught up in power ratios and number of feet from the subject. You need to do what makes the image look "right" to you. Check out the diagrams for general configurations of lights and techniques I have employed. Whether you want something soft and polished or something dark and dramatic, you'll find some helpful guidelines by reading on.

Using a single silver dish gives you a focused and harsh light source. In Figure 9.18, I have the subject right near the background so that the single light hits the background and casts a shadow from her body. Although the image is clean, it is also edgy with its dramatic light. To achieve this effect, I placed the silver dish

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