Fashion Photography Using Snoot

Foam core cards are basically thick white poster board, often with a foam backing. These boards are inexpensive, durable, and effective for use as reflectors.

To create a much more dramatic approach to a single light, pull the light more toward the model's side. By placing the light at a front 45-degree angle, you can create Rembrandt lighting, as demonstrated in Figure 9.10. Carefully watch the shadows on the face until a distinct triangle of light appears. To actually see the distinct triangle, you need to use a harsher light such as a beauty dish, a silver dish, or a snoot. I used a small silver dish to create the lighting effect shown in Figure 9.10. The entire image was made with just one light placed strategically to create this beautiful triangle shape. I most often utilize this technique on men, but here you can see it creates an elegant drama for women as well.

Lighting Effects Fashion Photography

Figure 9.10

You can use a single light to create dramatic effects. Here, use of a silver dish light resulted in classical Rembrandt lighting, creating a sharp triangle of light under one eye.

Figure 9.10

You can use a single light to create dramatic effects. Here, use of a silver dish light resulted in classical Rembrandt lighting, creating a sharp triangle of light under one eye.

To make the highlights and shadows even more defined in this image, I increased the contrast in Photoshop. By making the shadows darker (dragging the black point) and the highlights lighter (increasing the exposure), I ramped up the dramatic effect.

To make the highlights and shadows even more defined in this image, I increased the contrast in Photoshop. By making the shadows darker (dragging the black point) and the highlights lighter (increasing the exposure), I ramped up the dramatic effect.

With just a single light, you can achieve vastly different and equally beautiful effects.

I add a second light when I need to define the subject from the background. The second light is used as either a hair light (light hitting the subject's hair or shoulders) or a background light.

I typically do not use a second light to fill in shadows. I control shadows with fill cards and the location of the main light. Instead, I use the second light to give definition to the subject.

In Figure 9.11, I added a rim light to the subject's hair and forearm to separate him from the background. Without the second light, the subject's light-colored hair would have simply blended in with the neutral gray background. The additional light gives a more polished look. The main light in this image is a single beauty dish to the front and right of the frame. The second light, a rim light on the hair, was a silver dish with barn doors to the back-right 45-degree angle to the subject.

In Figure 9.12, the second light in the image served as a background light. By illuminating the background, I created a highlight that separated the side of the face on the right from the background. Because of this highlight created by a snoot light modifier, you can see the contours of the subject's jaw, her ear, and the outlines of the Mickey hat in the photo. Without the highlight, the entire right side of the photo would have been a solid, dark mass. The main light in this image was a beauty dish to the front left of the frame. The light was at a high angle to the left, creating this dramatic Rembrandt lighting.

Dramatic Angle Photography

Figure 9.11

The first light used for this portrait was a beauty dish placed at a side angle to carve out the facial features. The second light was a silver dish with barn doors from a rear angle to define the hair and to create a highlight on the arm.

Figure 9.11

The first light used for this portrait was a beauty dish placed at a side angle to carve out the facial features. The second light was a silver dish with barn doors from a rear angle to define the hair and to create a highlight on the arm.

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