Tip

Consider having cold water and little snacks like crackers around to help your clients if they get hungry or thirsty.

Model Releases

I collect a model release with all my client shoots. If a shot from my fashion flair shoot comes out especially well, I want to be able to use it to promote myself and my work. I typically include a copy of the model release with the basic client information form. That way, all clients who fill out a form with their name, phone number, and email address also provide me with a release to use their images. I use a slightly modified version of the model release available on ASMP's site. (Search "ASMP model release" in Google.)

Google Search 70s FashionBasic Model Release Forms Photography

Toofs of the Trade: Basic Equipment a consider myself a creativity-driven photographer. I'm not much of a tech geek. Don't get me wrong; I know plenty about photography equipment, but I'd rather talk about creativity and inspiration than f-stops and camera accessories.

Stunning images can be made no matter what equipment you use. In fact, I recently came across a pretty nice fashion shoot that was done 100 percent on an iPhone. Granted, you can't enlarge these images because of the low megapixels, but they were beautiful because the photographer recognized the rules of lighting, composition, and posing.

That being said, photography equipment provides specialized tools to achieve the creative effects you want. If you know how to correctly use your photographic equipment and are aware of the equipment available to you, new venues of creativity may open themselves to you.

I'll say this repeatedly throughout this chapter, but there is no "right answer" for equipment. There is no right lens or right camera. For example, some fashion photographers shoot with state-of-the-art cameras with weather-proof casing and extremely high megapixels and aim for sharp images. Other fashion photographers shoot with a Holga, which is known for its distortions, vignetting, light leaks, blurry images, and low quality to aim for creative effects. Figure 5.1 is an image of a Twin Lens Reflex Holga. The body is extremely light, made of plastic, and has minimal controls. In fact, you can't even really set the shutter speed; you control it with your finger. The shutter speed is determined by how long you depress the shutter. The accidents or "mistakes" that occur when using a Holga can be quite interesting with artistic blurs and colors.

Figure 5.1

A Holga camera is an inexpensive, plastic camera known for its distortions and light leaks that often result in a creative, edgy look.

Figure 5.1

A Holga camera is an inexpensive, plastic camera known for its distortions and light leaks that often result in a creative, edgy look.

Following are my recommendations for equipment, not my formula for success.

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