Mud Guards

EIGHTEENTH CENTURY

A PAIR of mud guards, intended for the use of gentlemen riding in knee breeches and stockings and when not wearing riding-boots. Each guard is made of one piece of stout leather, shaped as a half-leg and foot, and fastened to the stirrup ; a leather socket inside the top and an incision over the instep allows the stirrup strap to pass through, while there are two small incisions at the side for a strap which would keep the stirrup iron in position. The original spurs are fixtures on the guards, but have been at some time or other lowered from their previous position, which was evidently too high and too far outwards to have been effectively used on the horse's flanks.

These very singular guards were found in Bolsover Castle, and arc now in that excellent collection of foot-gear in the Northampton Museum.

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