Contributors

CAROL BRENNAN. Freelance Writer, Crosse Pointe, MI.

ROB EDELMAN. Instructor, State University of New York at Albany. Author, Baseball on the Web (1997) and The Great Baseball Films (1994). Co-author, Matthau: A Life (2002); Meet the Mertzes (1999); and Angela Lansbury: A Life on Stage and Screen (1996). Contributing editor, Leonard Maltin's Move & Video Guide, Leonard Maltin's Movie Encyclopedia, and Leonard Maltin's Family Viewing Guide. Contributing writer, International Dictionary of Films and Filmmakers (2000); St. James Encyclopedia of Popular Culture (2000); Women Filmmakers & Their Films (1998); The Political Companion to American Film (1994); and Total Baseball (1989). Film commentator, WAMC (Northeast) Public Radio.

TINA GIANOULIS. Freelance Writer. Contributing writer, World War I Reference Library (2002); Constitutional Amendments: From Freedom of Speech to Flag Burning (2001); International Dictionary of Films and Filmmakers (2000); St. James Encyclopedia of Popular Culture (2000); and mystories.com, a daytime drama Web site (1997-98).

AUDREY KUPFERBERG. Film consultant and archivist. Instructor, State University of New York at Albany. Co-author, Matthau: A Life (2002); Meet the Mertzes (1999); and Angela Lansbury: A Life on Stage and Screen (1996). Contributing editor, Leonard Maltin's

Family ViewingGuide. Contributing writer, St. James Encyclopedia ofPopular Culture (2000). Editor, Rhythm (2001), a magazine of world music and global culture.

SARA PENDERGAST. President, Full Circle Editorial. Vice president, Group 3 Editorial. Co-editor, St. James Encyclopedia of Popular Culture (2000). Co-author, World War I Reference Library (2002), among other publications.

TOM PENDERGAST. Editorial director, Full Circle Editorial. Ph.D., American studies, Purdue University. Author, Creating the Modern Man: American Magazines and Consumer Culture (2000). Coeditor, St. James Encyclopedia ofPopular Culture (2000).

ROBERT E. SCHNAKENBERG. Senior writer, History Book Club. Author, The Encyclopedia Shatnerica (1998).

c. 3100 b.c.e. ■ Egyptians perfume their bodies by coating their skin in fragrant oils and ointments.

c. 3000 b.c.e. ■ Men and women in the Middle East, Africa, and the Far East have wrapped turbans on their heads since ancient times, and the turban continues to be popular with both men and women in many modern cultures.

c. 2600 b.c.e. TO 900 c.e. ■ Ancient Mayans, whose civilization flourishes in Belize and on the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico, flatten the heads of the children of wealthy and powerful members of society. The children's heads are squeezed between two boards to elongate their skulls into a shape that looks very similar to an ear of corn.

c. 2500 b.c.e. ■ Indians wear a wrapped style of trousers called a dhoti and a skirt-like lower body covering called a lungi.

c. 2500 b.c.e. ■ Indian women begin to adorn themselves in the wrapped dress style called a sari.

c. 1500 b.c.e. ■ Egyptian men adopt the tunic as an upper body covering when Egypt conquers Syria.

c. 27 b.c.e.-476 c.e. ■ Roman soldiers, especially horsemen, adopt the trousers, or feminalia, of the nomadic tribes they encounter on the outskirts of the Roman Empire.

SIXTH AND FIFTH CENTURIES b.c.e. ■ The doric chiton becomes one of the most popular garments for both men and women in ancient Greece.

FIFTH CENTURY b.c.e. ■ The toga, a wrapped garment, is favored by Romans.

Sumerian civilization c. 3500 b.c.e.

Beginnings of c. 2680-2526 b.c.e.

Building of the Great Pyramids near Giza, Egypt c. 1792-1750 b.c.e.

Hammurabi creates empire of Babylonia

Julius Caesar becomes Roman dictator for life and is then assassinated

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